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cat kidney failure end stage 2

cat kidney failure end stage 2

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< div class="outputarea" id="outputarea"> One of the most deadly diseases or conditions which afflicts felines is cat kidney disease. This condition is relatively common amongst older cats. As your cat ages, his kidney begins to lose nephrons, which are the functional cells that operate within the kidneys and help them to continue their filtration and detoxification processes. As this happens, toxins can begin to build up in the blood as kidney tissue begins to die. There are a number of different stages of cat kidney disease, and they generally correspond to a difference in kidney function and overall health in your cat. The end stage of kidney function is the last and most severe of these stages. End Stage of Kidney Disease At the end of your pet's bout with kidney disease, he'll likely have lost a great deal of his kidney function. His body will no longer be able to adequately process the toxins that it typically would have been able to. Unfortunately, the prognosis at the end stage of kidney function is very poor; it is typically only a matter of stabilizing your cat's system to allow him to die in a peaceful and comfortable manner. End stage kidney disease is represented with a few distinctive symptoms. In addition to the various other symptoms that will accompany decreased kidney function throughout the earlier stages of the disease (which may include vomiting, added urination, increased drinking of water, lethargy and more), watch out for these end stage kidney disease symptoms: Seizures Low body temperature Comatose state Severe lethargy and weakness Managing End Stage Kidney Disease By the time your pet has reached the end stages of kidney disease, there is very little to be done to remedy his situation or to improve his health. At the end stages of this condition, he is going through a process known as renal failure. This is a situation in which his kidneys are shutting down and will no longer work as they should. Throughout this entire process, it's best to monitor your cat closely for signs of his pain and discomfort. Many cats will experience increasingly violent seizures and may be very uncomfortable and unhappy. It's a good idea to monitor your cat during the end stages of kidney disease so that you know when the best time to euthanize him will be. While this is an incredibly difficult decision to make, most pet owners and vets alike agree that it is preferable to allowing your pet to die as a result of kidney failure in general. The very last moments of kidney failure are quite unpleasant and may be very difficult to see. For this reason, many owners choose to have their pets euthanized before they reach this final stage of kidney failure. For more information about managing kidney disease before it reaches this point, speak with your vet. Kidney disease, when detected early enough, is somewhat manageable; you can help to slow the degenerative process considerably.


I brought my 18-year-old cat home to die instead of having him euthanized because I'd rather he spend what little time he has left somewhere he feels safe and loved instead of somewhere he feels scared and uncomfortable. I'd like to hear from others who have been through this with their cats so I know what to expect over the next few days of kitty hospice care. Requisite pictures here. (He looks derpy because he was shot in the face as a kitten 17 years ago.) His kidneys got really bad really fast. They were OK a month ago when he went to the vet for a UTI, then when was retested this weekend after I took him to the emergency vet for vomiting he got the worst kidney test results that his regular vet said he's ever seen. His vet was surprised that my cat is even still alive and thus said it won't be very long (a few hours or days) until he dies. He gave him some IV fluids for his dehydration and a painkiller shot for his arthritis (we'd been avoiding painkillers previously because they'd stress his kidneys, but now that he's dying anyway we figure that he might as well not be in pain) in the clinic before sending him home with me. That was 12 hours ago and the cat is still alive, awake, and alert. He hasn't slept at all since coming home -- he keeps starting to nod off but then jerks back awake like he's fighting against falling asleep. I've been offering him food and fluids in bed (holding the plate/bowl up to his face so he doesn't have to get up) about once an hour and he has eaten a lot of tuna and a little salmon (but rejected chicken, canned cat food, and his dry cat treats) and has drunk some tuna-flavored pedialyte and water. When he gets restless I put him in the litter box -- he has peed 4 times since getting home -- and then lift him back into bed because he is too wobbly to climb in and out on his own. I have liquid metacam painkiller to give him every 12 hours for however long he lasts. It seems to help a lot -- this afternoon after the painkiller kicked in he was feeling well enough to go outside and walk around a bit. We sat out there for a couple hours until the wind got too cold and I brought him back inside to lie on his heated sleeping pad in bed next to me. He seems to prefer that to my lap or chest -- his temperature has been very low (the emergency vet had to keep him in a special warming cage all weekend) so I've also got him covered up and that seems to be keeping him warm. He has hardly purred at all today (once when I first got him home and snuggled him in bed, and once when the inlaws came over to say goodbye to him) but he's not crying either. As far as I can tell, he's not in pain, just groggy, disoriented, weak, and too wobbly to stand or walk. For those of you who have had cats die at home from kidney failure, what can I expect to happen over the next few days? A friend of mine recently had his cat die from kidney failure and he said his cat was having seizures on the last day, but his cat had other medical conditions that my cat doesn't so I don't know if that's normal for cats dying of kidney failure? I'd also appreciate any suggestions for how to make him as comfortable and happy as possible. I don't have anywhere else I need to be or anything else I need to do this week besides be here for my cat. Thanks. posted by Jacqueline to Pets & Animals (33 answers total) 9 users marked this as a favorite


Requisite pictures here. (He looks derpy because he was shot in the face as a kitten 17 years ago.) His kidneys got really bad really fast. They were OK a month ago when he went to the vet for a UTI, then when was retested this weekend after I took him to the emergency vet for vomiting he got the worst kidney test results that his regular vet said he's ever seen. His vet was surprised that my cat is even still alive and thus said it won't be very long (a few hours or days) until he dies. He gave him some IV fluids for his dehydration and a painkiller shot for his arthritis (we'd been avoiding painkillers previously because they'd stress his kidneys, but now that he's dying anyway we figure that he might as well not be in pain) in the clinic before sending him home with me. That was 12 hours ago and the cat is still alive, awake, and alert. He hasn't slept at all since coming home -- he keeps starting to nod off but then jerks back awake like he's fighting against falling asleep. I've been offering him food and fluids in bed (holding the plate/bowl up to his face so he doesn't have to get up) about once an hour and he has eaten a lot of tuna and a little salmon (but rejected chicken, canned cat food, and his dry cat treats) and has drunk some tuna-flavored pedialyte and water. When he gets restless I put him in the litter box -- he has peed 4 times since getting home -- and then lift him back into bed because he is too wobbly to climb in and out on his own. I have liquid metacam painkiller to give him every 12 hours for however long he lasts. It seems to help a lot -- this afternoon after the painkiller kicked in he was feeling well enough to go outside and walk around a bit. We sat out there for a couple hours until the wind got too cold and I brought him back inside to lie on his heated sleeping pad in bed next to me. He seems to prefer that to my lap or chest -- his temperature has been very low (the emergency vet had to keep him in a special warming cage all weekend) so I've also got him covered up and that seems to be keeping him warm. He has hardly purred at all today (once when I first got him home and snuggled him in bed, and once when the inlaws came over to say goodbye to him) but he's not crying either. As far as I can tell, he's not in pain, just groggy, disoriented, weak, and too wobbly to stand or walk. For those of you who have had cats die at home from kidney failure, what can I expect to happen over the next few days? A friend of mine recently had his cat die from kidney failure and he said his cat was having seizures on the last day, but his cat had other medical conditions that my cat doesn't so I don't know if that's normal for cats dying of kidney failure? I'd also appreciate any suggestions for how to make him as comfortable and happy as possible. I don't have anywhere else I need to be or anything else I need to do this week besides be here for my cat. Thanks.