Cat Roundworm Treatment

cat roundworm treatment 1

Cat Roundworm Treatment. Roundworms Roundworms are the most common of the parasitic worms found inside a cat (or dog). Almost all cats become infected with them at some time in their lives, usually as kittens. Roundworms may be contracted in different ways, making them easy to spread and hard to control. Your cat may take in (ingest) infective roundworm eggs from the area where it lives or by eating mice or other small animals (“hosts”) carrying young worms (larvae). Infection in kittens may also occur through the mother’s milk. How will roundworms affect my cat? Adult roundworms live in the cat’s intestines. Most cats will not have signs of infection; however, cats with major roundworm infections commonly show vomiting, weight loss, dull hair, and a potbellied appearance. The cat may cough if the roundworms move into the lungs. You may notice adult roundworms in your cat’s feces or vomit. They will appear white or light brown in color and may be several inches long. How do I prevent my cat from getting roundworms? Because roundworms can enter your cat’s body in many different ways, it is essential to keep your cat’s living area clean (regular cleaning of the litter box) and, if possible, keep your cat indoors to prevent it from eating wild animals that may carry roundworms. Kittens should be treated for roundworms every 2 weeks between three and nine weeks of age and then receive a preventive treatment monthly. Fecal (stool) examinations should be conducted 2 to 4 times during the first year of life and 1 or 2 times each year in adults. Nursing mothers (queens) should be kept on monthly preventive and treated along with their kittens.

Cat Roundworm Treatment

Cat Roundworm Treatment

A monthly parasite control product effective against roundworms is recommended to treat potential new infections. Many heartworm medications also control roundworms so ask your veterinarian about prevention and treatment choices. Can humans be harmed by roundworms? Roundworms do pose a significant risk to humans. Contact with contaminated soil or feces can result in human ingestion and infection. Roundworm eggs may accumulate in significant numbers in the soil where pets deposit feces. Children should not be allowed to play where animals have passed feces. Individuals who have direct contact with soil that may have been contaminated by cat or dog feces should wear gloves or wash their hands immediately. Did you know? People can get roundworms from contact with feces or contaminated soil. Children and pregnant women are especially at risk. Cats can get roundworms by eating wild animals as well as from feces or a contaminated environment. Most cats are infected with roundworms at some point in their life. They often show no symptoms. If your cat suffers weight loss, dull hair, and a potbellied appearance, it may have a major roundworm infection. You may see roundworms in your cat’s feces or vomit. Your veterinarian can help you with roundworm prevention, examination, and treatment. Other kinds of worms that cats can get include heartworms, hookworms, and tapeworms. Learn More about Specific Parasites Overview Coccidia Dandruff Ear Mites Fleas Heartworms Hookworms Mange Roundworms Tapeworms Ticks Toxoplasmosis Overview Coccidia Dandruff Ear Mites Fleas Heartworms Hookworms Mange Roundworms Tapeworms Ticks Toxoplasmosis Ask Your Veterinarian About Roundworm Preventio It may not be obvious even if your kitten or cat has roundworms, and yet people can be infected by them. For this reason, it is a good idea to have a regular program of preventative treatment starting with kittens at three weeks of age. Cats should have fecal (stool) exams 2 to 4 times in their first year of life and once or twice a year thereafter. The best way to control roundworms is to be sure to be sure to use a parasite control product recommended by your veterinarian every month.
cat roundworm treatment 1

Cat Roundworm Treatment

Roundworms Roundworms are the most common of the parasitic worms found inside a cat (or dog). Almost all cats become infected with them at some time in their lives, usually as kittens. Roundworms may be contracted in different ways, making them easy to spread and hard to control. Your cat may take in (ingest) infective roundworm eggs from the area where it lives or by eating mice or other small animals (“hosts”) carrying young worms (larvae). Infection in kittens may also occur through the mother’s milk. How will roundworms affect my cat? Adult roundworms live in the cat’s intestines. Most cats will not have signs of infection; however, cats with major roundworm infections commonly show vomiting, weight loss, dull hair, and a potbellied appearance. The cat may cough if the roundworms move into the lungs. You may notice adult roundworms in your cat’s feces or vomit. They will appear white or light brown in color and may be several inches long. How do I prevent my cat from getting roundworms? Because roundworms can enter your cat’s body in many different ways, it is essential to keep your cat’s living area clean (regular cleaning of the litter box) and, if possible, keep your cat indoors to prevent it from eating wild animals that may carry roundworms. Kittens should be treated for roundworms every 2 weeks between three and nine weeks of age and then receive a preventive treatment monthly. Fecal (stool) examinations should be conducted 2 to 4 times during the first year of life and 1 or 2 times each year in adults. Nursing mothers (queens) should be kept on monthly preventive and treated along with their kittens. A monthly parasite control product effective against roundworms is recommended to treat potential new infections. Many heartworm medications also control roundworms so ask your veterinarian about prevention and treatment choices. Can humans be harmed by roundworms?

Roundworms do pose a significant risk to humans. Contact with contaminated soil or feces can result in human ingestion and infection. Roundworm eggs may accumulate in significant numbers in the soil where pets deposit feces. Children should not be allowed to play where animals have passed feces. Individuals who have direct contact with soil that may have been contaminated by cat or dog feces should wear gloves or wash their hands immediately. Did you know? People can get roundworms from contact with feces or contaminated soil. Children and pregnant women are especially at risk. Cats can get roundworms by eating wild animals as well as from feces or a contaminated environment. Most cats are infected with roundworms at some point in their life. They often show no symptoms. If your cat suffers weight loss, dull hair, and a potbellied appearance, it may have a major roundworm infection. You may see roundworms in your cat’s feces or vomit. Your veterinarian can help you with roundworm prevention, examination, and treatment. Other kinds of worms that cats can get include heartworms, hookworms, and tapeworms. Learn More about Specific Parasites Overview Coccidia Dandruff Ear Mites Fleas Heartworms Hookworms Mange Roundworms Tapeworms Ticks Toxoplasmosis
cat roundworm treatment 2

Preventing hunting behavior as well as maintaining rodent control. If you are planning to mate your queen, she should be de-wormed prior to mating and receive another dose late in pregnancy. Keep litter trays clean, solids should be scooped at least once or twice a day and thoroughly disinfected once a week. Dispose of cat feces in the garbage, don’t put it in the garden. If your cat does defecate in the garden, remove feces daily. If you have a sandpit in your garden, make sure it is covered up when not in use to prevent cats defecating in it. Kittens should be dewormed from two weeks of age, and every two weeks until they are 12 weeks old. Adults should be de-wormed every 3-6 months, or as stated on your worming medication. Quick guide to worming cats Brand name/active ingredient Parasites treated Age/pregnant etc Advocate/Advantage Multi (Imidacloprid and Moxidectin) Spot on (monthly) Fleas (adult), roundworms, hookworms, lungworm and ear mites. Heartworm preventative. Does not treat tapeworm. 9 weeks old. Safe use on pregnant and lactating females has not been established. Aristopet (Praziquantel and Pyrantel embolate) Tablets Roundworm, hookworm and tapeworm. 6 weeks old. Can be used on pregnant and lactating females.

Excelpet (Praziquantel and Pyrantel Embolate) Tablets Roundworm, hookworm and tapeworm. 6 weeks old. Can be used on pregnant and lactating females. Heartgard (Ivermectin and Pyrantel) Chews Roundworm, hookworm, heartworm preventative. 6 weeks old. Can be used on pregnant and lactating females. Milbemax (Milbemycin Oxime and Praziquantel) Tablets Roundworm, hookworm, tapeworm. Heartworm preventative. 6 weeks and over 500g. Can be used on pregnant and lactating females. Panacur (Fenbendazole) Tablets and paste Tapeworm (Taenia taeniaeformis species), roundworm, hookworm, whipworm, lungworm and giardia. Does not treat Dipylidium caninum tapeworm. Can be used on pregnant and lactating cats and kittens over 2 weeks. Popantel (Praziquantel) Tablets Roundworm, hookworm and tapeworm. Can be used on pregnant and lactating cats and kittens over 6 weeks. Profender (Praziquantel and Emodepside) Spot on (monthly) Roundworm, hookworm, tapeworm and lungworm. 8 weeks and over 500g. Can be used on pregnant and lactating cats. Purina Total Care (Pyrantel embolate and Niclosamide) Paste and tablets Roundworm, hookworm and tapeworm. 6 weeks old. Can be used on pregnant and lactating cats. Revolution (Selamectin) Spot on (monthly) Fleas (adult, larvae and eggs), intestinal worms (except tapeworm), lungworm and ear mites. Heartworm preventative. Does not treat tapeworm. 6 weeks old. Can be used on pregnant and lactating females.

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