Cat’s Claw Tea

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Cat's Claw Tea

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions: Used for Why 3 Stars Osteoarthritis 100 mg of a freeze-dried preparation daily Cat’s claw has been used traditionally for osteoarthritis. In one trial, cat’s claw was significantly more effective than a placebo at relieving pain and improving overall condition. Cat’s claw has been used traditionally for osteoarthritis. In a double-blind trial, 100 mg per day of a freeze-dried preparation of cat’s claw taken for four weeks was significantly more effective than a placebo at relieving pain and improving the overall condition. 2 Stars Rheumatoid Arthritis Refer to label instructions Cat’s claw has been used traditionally to treat rheumatoid arthritis. In a double-blind trial, supplementation with an extract from cat’s claw (Uncaria tomentosa) for 24 weeks was significantly more effective than a placebo in reducing the number of painful joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The amount used was 20 mg of extract three times per day. The extract was obtained from a specific strain of cat’s claw that contains pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids, compounds that appear to influence the activity of the immune system. The extract was purified to be free of tetracyclic oxindole alkaloids, which may inhibit the beneficial effects of the other alkaloids. 1 Star HIV and AIDS Support Refer to label instructions Cat’s claw is an immuno-modulating herb. Standardized extracts of it have been shown to help prevent CD4 cell counts from dropping and to prevent opportunistic infections. Cat’s claw is another immuno-modulating herb. Standardized extracts of cat’s claw have been tested in small, preliminary trials in people infected with HIV, showing some benefits in preventing CD4 cell counts from dropping and in preventing opportunistic infections. Further study is needed to determine whether cat’s claw is truly beneficial for people with HIV infection or AIDS. 1 Star Immune Function Refer to label instructions Substances found in cat’s claw, called oxyindole alkaloids, have been shown to stimulate the immune system. Substances found in cat’s claw, called oxyindole alkaloids have been shown to stimulate the immune system. However, little is known about whether this effect is sufficient to prevent or treat disease.
cat's claw tea 1

Cat's Claw Tea

How It WorksBotanical names: Uncaria tomentosa How It Works According to test tube studies, oxyindole alkaloids in cat’s claw stimulate immune function.2 Alkaloids and glycosides in cat’s claw have also demonstrated anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity.3 , 4 Although clinical trials are lacking, cat’s claw has become very popular in North America and is sometimes recommended for people with cancer or HIV infection. A cigarette smoker who took a freeze-dried extract of cat’s claw root bark for one month showed a sharp decrease in one urinary cancer marker.5 This finding, however, does little to support the use of the herb in persons with cancer and points toward the need for actual clinical studies to determine its effectiveness. Cat’s claw has been used traditionally for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Double-blind trials have confirmed the effectiveness of cat’s claw for each of these conditions.6 7 How to Use It In a study of patients with osteoarthritis, 100 mg per day of a freeze-dried preparation was used. Cat’s claw tea is prepared from 1/4 teaspoon (1 gram) of root bark by adding 1 cup (250 ml) of water and boiling for ten to fifteen minutes. Cool, strain and drink one cup three times per day. Alternatively, 1/4–1/2 teaspoon (1–2 ml) of tincture can be taken up to two times per day, or 20–60 mg of a dry standardized extract can be taken once per day.8
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Cat's Claw Tea

How It Works According to test tube studies, oxyindole alkaloids in cat’s claw stimulate immune function.2 Alkaloids and glycosides in cat’s claw have also demonstrated anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity.3 , 4 Although clinical trials are lacking, cat’s claw has become very popular in North America and is sometimes recommended for people with cancer or HIV infection. A cigarette smoker who took a freeze-dried extract of cat’s claw root bark for one month showed a sharp decrease in one urinary cancer marker.5 This finding, however, does little to support the use of the herb in persons with cancer and points toward the need for actual clinical studies to determine its effectiveness. Cat’s claw has been used traditionally for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Double-blind trials have confirmed the effectiveness of cat’s claw for each of these conditions.6 7
cat's claw tea 3

Cat's Claw Tea

According to test tube studies, oxyindole alkaloids in cat’s claw stimulate immune function.2 Alkaloids and glycosides in cat’s claw have also demonstrated anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity.3 , 4 Although clinical trials are lacking, cat’s claw has become very popular in North America and is sometimes recommended for people with cancer or HIV infection. A cigarette smoker who took a freeze-dried extract of cat’s claw root bark for one month showed a sharp decrease in one urinary cancer marker.5 This finding, however, does little to support the use of the herb in persons with cancer and points toward the need for actual clinical studies to determine its effectiveness. Cat’s claw has been used traditionally for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Double-blind trials have confirmed the effectiveness of cat’s claw for each of these conditions.6 7
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Cat's Claw Tea

The two known species of cat’s claw are Uncaria guianensis, used traditionally for wound healing, and Uncaria tomentosa, which has numerous medicinal uses and is most commonly found in supplements. Cat’s claw is a rich source of phytochemicals: its more than 30 known constituents include at least 17 alkaloids, along with glycosides, tannins, flavonoids, sterol fractions, and other compounds. Scientists previously attributed the efficacy of cat’s claw to compounds called oxindole alkaloids;1 more recently, however, water-soluble cat’s claw extracts that do not contain significant amounts of alkaloids were found to possess strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. This finding led researchers to conclude that quinic acid esters are the active constituents of water-soluble cat’s claw extract.2
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Cat's Claw Tea

Side EffectsBotanical names: Uncaria tomentosa Side Effects Although no serious adverse effects have been reported for cat’s claw, there is little known about its safety because most reports have been based on anecdotal evidence. There is one case report in which Parkinson’s disease became worse after a man started using cat’s claw and improved after cat’s claw was discontinued.9 Cat’s claw should be used with caution in people with autoimmune illness, multiple sclerosis, and tuberculosis. Until proven safe, cat’s claw should not be taken by pregnant or breast-feeding women.
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Cat's Claw Tea

Side Effects Although no serious adverse effects have been reported for cat’s claw, there is little known about its safety because most reports have been based on anecdotal evidence. There is one case report in which Parkinson’s disease became worse after a man started using cat’s claw and improved after cat’s claw was discontinued.9 Cat’s claw should be used with caution in people with autoimmune illness, multiple sclerosis, and tuberculosis. Until proven safe, cat’s claw should not be taken by pregnant or breast-feeding women.
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Although no serious adverse effects have been reported for cat’s claw, there is little known about its safety because most reports have been based on anecdotal evidence. There is one case report in which Parkinson’s disease became worse after a man started using cat’s claw and improved after cat’s claw was discontinued.9 Cat’s claw should be used with caution in people with autoimmune illness, multiple sclerosis, and tuberculosis. Until proven safe, cat’s claw should not be taken by pregnant or breast-feeding women.
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What is Cat’s Claw? Cat’s Claw is the bark and root parts of a woody vine which grows in the “montaña” part of the Peruvian Amazon, which is the cooler, higher elevation part of the Amazon (approximately 600-1000 meters above sea level). The root of the plant, which may contain a higher percentage of some phytoactives is illegal to be collected in Peru, because it endangers the survival of the species. Another species is also known as Uña de Gato (Cat’s Claw). This species, Uncaria guianensis, grows at sea level and low altitudes, and does not contain the immune system strengthening compounds of Uncaria tomentosa, although it has the other beneficial properties. This is a cheaper more abundant species to collect and the bark from both plants is virtually indistinguishable. The easiest way to tell the two species apart is by the leaf. Uncaria tomentosa has fine hairs which grow on the underside of the leaf. Ultimately, the best insurance that you are getting the correct species of Cat’s Claw in your herbal extract is both the reputation of the Herbal company you buy from and “finger print” of the plant being sold. These will soon be available for inspection through Whole World Botanicals. Reducing Your Risk for Breast Cancer and Staying Healthy after Breast Cancer Treatment What makes Royal Cat’s Claw products Royal?
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In the 20th century, a German natural scientist named Arturo Brell is responsible for making cat’s claw become popular. In 1926, he moved from Munich to Pozuzo, which is a small town founded by German colonists in the Peruvian rain forest. Once in Pozuzo, Brell used cat’s claw to treat his own rheumatic pain. Later on, he used cat’s claw to treat a fellow colonist, Luis Schuler, who had terminal lung cancer. After other various failed approaches, Schuler started drinking cat’s claw root tea three times a day to treat his cancer. It’s said that he improved dramatically, and after a year, he was cancer-free.

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