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Crate Training A Cat

Crate Training A Cat

Crate Training A Cat. Carlina Teteris / Getty Images Cat training to ​a crate often is neglected, although it gets lots of attention with dog owners. Kittens learn more easily and quickly than adult cats, but even set-in-their-ways felines can accept cat training to crate.Kittens and cats should always ride in a carrier when traveling in your car to keep them from distracting the driver. Pets become furry projectiles should you be in an accident, but a carrier protects the kitten and also keeps him from running away in fear and pain should he escape. Cat Training to CrateMost cats hate the crate simply because it’s used so seldom and associated with scary stuff. How many times have you pulled the kitty carrier out of the closet, only to have the cat disappear? Most felines only see the crate to be taken to the veterinarian or groomer. Kitty is no dummy—it only takes once for her to learn that CRATE means NEEDLES, or a thermometer placed in a rude location. In fact, surveys report that “hates the crate” is a top reason cats don’t visit the veterinarian as often as they should.Instead, train your kitten to associate the crate/carrier with fun, positive experiences. This allows you to quickly confine and safely transport the cat whenever necessary, rather than play hide-and-seek during emergencies to find the frightened feline.

Crate Training A Cat

Happy acceptance of the crate also means less stress, and a happier, emotionally healthier cat.10 Tips for Cat Crate TrainingMake the crate part of the furniture—set it on the floor in a corner of the room for Kitty to explore at his leisure. If it’s out all the time, the “strange/scary” factor wears off. Take the door off so he can come and go.Toss a soft blanket or towel inside for a bed, especially one that you’ve rubbed over him so it smells like the cat.Spritzing a bit of Feliway on the inside of the crate can help calm kitty fears. Feliway is an analogue of the cheek pheromone that makes cats feel safe. If you’ve chosen a hard crate, toss in a ping-pong ball inside to create a kitty playground.For treat-motivated cats, leave tasty tidbits inside for Kitty to find so he discovers the magical-crate has the most delicious smelly bonuses for going inside. You want to make the crate the most fun place in the house.Consider using clicker training to inspire your cat to quickly go into the crate. Review how to “load the clicker” and locate the training treats for spur of the moment sessions. Then wait for the opportunity when you see Kitty approach, sniff, or enter the crate. Click the clicker to tell the cat THAT (touching/going inside/even approaching) the crate is what you want, and then reward with the treat or favorite toy. The more you practice, the better Kitty will become at hanging out near or even inside the crate.  It may take a week or more for the kitten or cat to feel comfortable around the carrier. Once that happens, put the door back on, and wait until Kitty goes inside. Then shut the door while praising him in a calm, happy voice that’s matter of fact to convince Kitty this is normal and no reason for upset feelings. After a minute or so, let him out and give him a treat or toy reserved only for his best performance. Praise the dickens out of him! He should know that staying calm inside the crate earns him good things. Repeat training sessions at least once a day over the next two weeks, building up the time until the kitty stays inside three minutes, four, then five minutes and so on.Once he’s reached ten minutes and remains calm, pick up the carrier while he’s in it and carry him around, and then let him out. Take him in the carrier out to the car, sit there and talk to him, then bring him back into the house and release him–don’t forget to offer the treat.Soon, you should be able to take him for car rides in his carrier, without him throwing a fit. He’ll learn that most times, the carrier means good things for him–and the vet visit isn’t the only association it has. Read More
crate training a cat 1

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Crate Training A Cat

Cat training to ​a crate often is neglected, although it gets lots of attention with dog owners. Kittens learn more easily and quickly than adult cats, but even set-in-their-ways felines can accept cat training to crate.Kittens and cats should always ride in a carrier when traveling in your car to keep them from distracting the driver. Pets become furry projectiles should you be in an accident, but a carrier protects the kitten and also keeps him from running away in fear and pain should he escape. Cat Training to CrateMost cats hate the crate simply because it’s used so seldom and associated with scary stuff. How many times have you pulled the kitty carrier out of the closet, only to have the cat disappear? Most felines only see the crate to be taken to the veterinarian or groomer. Kitty is no dummy—it only takes once for her to learn that CRATE means NEEDLES, or a thermometer placed in a rude location. In fact, surveys report that “hates the crate” is a top reason cats don’t visit the veterinarian as often as they should.Instead, train your kitten to associate the crate/carrier with fun, positive experiences. This allows you to quickly confine and safely transport the cat whenever necessary, rather than play hide-and-seek during emergencies to find the frightened feline. Happy acceptance of the crate also means less stress, and a happier, emotionally healthier cat.10 Tips for Cat Crate TrainingMake the crate part of the furniture—set it on the floor in a corner of the room for Kitty to explore at his leisure. If it’s out all the time, the “strange/scary” factor wears off.

Crate Training A Cat

Take the door off so he can come and go.Toss a soft blanket or towel inside for a bed, especially one that you’ve rubbed over him so it smells like the cat.Spritzing a bit of Feliway on the inside of the crate can help calm kitty fears. Feliway is an analogue of the cheek pheromone that makes cats feel safe. If you’ve chosen a hard crate, toss in a ping-pong ball inside to create a kitty playground.For treat-motivated cats, leave tasty tidbits inside for Kitty to find so he discovers the magical-crate has the most delicious smelly bonuses for going inside. You want to make the crate the most fun place in the house.Consider using clicker training to inspire your cat to quickly go into the crate. Review how to “load the clicker” and locate the training treats for spur of the moment sessions. Then wait for the opportunity when you see Kitty approach, sniff, or enter the crate. Click the clicker to tell the cat THAT (touching/going inside/even approaching) the crate is what you want, and then reward with the treat or favorite toy. The more you practice, the better Kitty will become at hanging out near or even inside the crate.  It may take a week or more for the kitten or cat to feel comfortable around the carrier. Once that happens, put the door back on, and wait until Kitty goes inside. Then shut the door while praising him in a calm, happy voice that’s matter of fact to convince Kitty this is normal and no reason for upset feelings. After a minute or so, let him out and give him a treat or toy reserved only for his best performance. Praise the dickens out of him! He should know that staying calm inside the crate earns him good things. Repeat training sessions at least once a day over the next two weeks, building up the time until the kitty stays inside three minutes, four, then five minutes and so on.Once he’s reached ten minutes and remains calm, pick up the carrier while he’s in it and carry him around, and then let him out. Take him in the carrier out to the car, sit there and talk to him, then bring him back into the house and release him–don’t forget to offer the treat.Soon, you should be able to take him for car rides in his carrier, without him throwing a fit. He’ll learn that most times, the carrier means good things for him–and the vet visit isn’t the only association it has.
crate training a cat 2

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Crate Training A Cat

While it may seem unnecessary to lock up your kitty, there are some instances when keeping your cat in a pet crate overnight may be beneficial to you and your kitty. There are crates specifically designed for housing animals, and these range in material, size, and cost. The Nest provides us with a few tips about crating your cat at night. When to Crate There are a number of situations when crating your cat might be a good idea. In general, a happy, healthy, well-adjusted kitty shouldn’t need nightly crating. If your kitten or cat is having difficulty making proper use of its litter box, it might be best to keep your cat in a crate at night while you train her to use the litter box. If your cat is ill and requires medication that is difficult to administer, a crate can be a useful way to confine and calm you cat while it isn’t feeling quite itself. When bringing a new feline family member into the house, you may find that a crate will facilitate the transition and permit a more amiable getting-used-to-each-other period. Many people also utilize crates to house adopted feral cats, as this can help tame and ease the cat into its new social environment. Choosing the Right Crate There is a distinct difference between a carrier and a crate. The small, dark, cramped carrier that you use to temporarily house your cat while transporting it to the veterinarian is not the same as a crate. Never use a cat carrier as a “bedroom” for your cat. A crate, similar to a kennel for dogs, is far more open, both for sight and air circulation. Whether you choose the metal wire or nylon mesh variety, you should consider the necessary size for your cat. Though crates come in all sizes, you’ll probably want one that is intended to house a large dog, considering that you will need to have room for a litter box, a bed or blanket, some toys, and bowls for water and food. A Room Just for Kitty A crate that is left open can also serve as a place of refuge for a cat that is skittish around new people or even when your loving family cat needs a little alone time. Keep it well stocked with a comfortable bed or comforter, a number of preferred toys, a litter box, and bowls for food and water. This crate can be your cat’s own personal space to relax. If you are opposed, then the Kitty Play Zone, from the makers of the Litter-Robot, might be just the thing. The Kitty Play Zone is a cardboard playhouse for cats that doesn’t confine your cat like a crate. It comes with two bowls and doubles as a private feeding station. It’s the perfect structure to give your cat a little room of its own and your kids will love constructing and decorating, too! So, if your cat is having a behavioral or medical issue, then a crate may be a necessary addition to your home. But if it’s just a matter of providing your kitty with a bit of privacy, then you may just be looking for a Kitty Play Zone!.

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Crate Training A Cat

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