Eye Drops For Cats

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Eye Drops For Cats. Continued Eye Discharge Treatments Because so many conditions can lead to eye discharge in cats, you really need to talk to your veterinarian before trying any eye discharge treatments on your cat. Depending on what your veterinarian finds, treatment for cat eye discharge might include: Feline upper respiratory infections . Specific treatments depend on the cause of the infection as well as how serious it is and may include eye medications, antibiotics, decongestants, and fluids. Conjunctivitis . Pollen, dust, weeds, or other irritants can cause conjunctivitis, which may be treated with antibiotic ointments. Corneal disorders . Treatment depends on what’s troubling your cat’s cornea, but may include keeping kitty’s eyes clean, antibiotic eye ointment or drops, removing loose corneal tissue, cauterization, or surgery. Watery, tearing eyes . Under general anesthesia, your vet may use plain water or saline to flush your cat’s blocked tear duct. If there’s an infection, antibiotic eye ointment or drops may be needed. Uveitis .

Eye Drops For Cats

The right treatment depends on what’s causing your cat’s uveitis, though that’s often hard to diagnose. Care may include eye ointment or drops to control inflammation and pain. Feline calicivirus . Secondary bacterial infections, which can cause pneumonia and other serious issues, are common with calicivirus, so always call your vet if you suspect your cat has this disease. Treatment may include symptom control, antibiotics for secondary infections, and supportive care. Dry eye . Many things can cause dry eye, from upper respiratory infection to distemper. Treatment can include eye drops or ointments, immune-suppressing drugs, antibiotics, or artificial tears. When to See a Vet Your cat’s eyes are as delicate as they are beautiful. Small problems can quickly turn into serious conditions. If your cat’s eye discharge symptoms don’t clear up within 24 hours or if your cat is squinting, talk to your veterinarian right away. If you have medications left over from a previous eye problem, don’t use them on your cat’s eyes. Different eye issues call for different medications, and you can end up causing serious injury by using the wrong one.
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Is it Safe to Use Eye Drops for Humans on a Cat?Pink eye often clears up after specifically formulated feline eye drops are administered. A commonly asked question is: Can I give my cat eye drops that were made for humans? While some eye drops can be used on both humans and cats, it is possible to deliver the wrong dose or use drops with preservatives that damage a cat’s eyes. The concentration and dosage of the medication may be different. Before administering, always take your bottle of eye drops to a veterinarian and ask them if the drops would be suitable for your cat.
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Your cat’s eyes, usually clear and bright, are looking a little gooey. She might be pawing at them, or rubbing her face against the sofa or on the rug. Clearly, something’s wrong. Anything from a simple cold to a serious illness could be be causing your cat’s eye discharge. Learn a few of the more common causes of eye discharge, when to see a vet, and what you can do at home to help your feline friend. Eye Discharge Causes A healthy cat’s eyes should be bright and clear. Eye problems can bring out another cat entirely, one who paws at his eyes, squints, or blinks excessively. Because eye problems can lead to devastating consequences — including surgery or blindness — always talk to your vet when you notice your cat has irritated eyes. A few common reasons for cat eye discharge include: Feline upper respiratory infections. A frequent cause of eye discharge in cats, these can include viruses such as feline calicivirus, a contagious respiratory disease, pneumonitis or rhinotracheitis (herpesvirus), bacteria, and protozoa. Symptoms can be mild or progress to something very serious and may include a sticky, pus-like eye discharge. Conjunctivitis (pink eye) . An inflammation of the light pink lining around your cat’s eye, conjunctivitis can cause one or both of your cat’s eyes to look red and swollen, be light-sensitive, and have clear, teary or thick, mucus eye discharge. Conjunctivitis with fever, diarrhea, and trouble breathing can point to potentially fatal feline infectious peritonitis, though this isn’t very common. Corneal disorders . A cat’s cornea, the dome-shaped surface that covers the front of the eye, can become inflamed, injured, or ulcerated. The result may be cloudiness, excessive blinking, inflammation, and increased tear production. Watery, tearing eyes (epiphora) . Blocked tear ducts, an overproduction of tears, allergies, viral conjunctivitis, and more can be behind your cat’s abnormal tearing. Uveitis. An inflammation of the internal structures of the eye, trauma, cancer, immune problems or infections can cause the serious, often painful inflammation of uveitis. Dry eye (keratoconjunctivitis sicca). A chronic lack of tear production, dry eye can lead to an inflamed cornea, red eyes, and if left untreated, blindness. Because the watery portion of tears is missing, a yellow, gooey eye discharge can result. Other eye discharge causes include feline infectious peritonitis, allergies, something lodged in the eye, or third eyelid problems.
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Pink eye often clears up after specifically formulated feline eye drops are administered. A commonly asked question is: Can I give my cat eye drops that were made for humans? While some eye drops can be used on both humans and cats, it is possible to deliver the wrong dose or use drops with preservatives that damage a cat’s eyes. The concentration and dosage of the medication may be different. Before administering, always take your bottle of eye drops to a veterinarian and ask them if the drops would be suitable for your cat.
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A commonly asked question is: Can I give my cat eye drops that were made for humans? While some eye drops can be used on both humans and cats, it is possible to deliver the wrong dose or use drops with preservatives that damage a cat’s eyes. The concentration and dosage of the medication may be different. Before administering, always take your bottle of eye drops to a veterinarian and ask them if the drops would be suitable for your cat.
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Administer the eye drops. Squeeze the bottle and quickly dispense the prescribed number of eye drops into your cat’s eye. Be careful not to dispense more than the prescribed amount. If both of her eyes need to be treated, repeat the same procedure to put drops in the other eye. If your cat seems restless and refuses to be still, consider trying again later when she is more calm. You do not want her moving around so much that you can’t get the drops into her eye.
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Give your cat a treat. A good way to distract your cat after giving her the eye drops is to give her something tasty to eat. Your cat would love a scrumptious treat, like a small piece of tuna, after the perceived indignity of receiving eye drops. You could also time the eye drop administration with mealtime so that you could reward her with a meal afterwards. You will probably need to give your cat eye drops several times a day, so be judicious with your treats. You do not want her to fill up on treats each time you administer the drops.
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Watch your cat for signs of discomfort. Usually, eye drops are not uncomfortable for cats. If anything, your cat will blink a lot after the drops hit her eyes. However, if the drops are bothersome, she may paw at her eyes or even try to rub her face across the floor. Contact your veterinarian if your cat becomes extremely bothered after getting the eye drops.
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Open your cat’s eyelids. Use the thumb of your non-dominant hand to pull down your cat’s lower eyelid. This will create a small pouch into which you can administer the eye drops. Although convenient, it is not necessary for the drops to go into the pouch. The drops will disperse quickly across your cat’s eye, so you do not have to worry about placing the drops in a particular spot on her eye.
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There is no cat in the world that likes being restrained and watching a big drop of something come at her eye. Your cat’s extreme dislike for eye drops might have you thinking you need to go to your veterinarian in order to get the job done. However, with some patience and gentle restraint, administering eye drops is something you can do at home. It may take a few tries before your cat becomes a willing participant, but her eyes will feel much better when you can successfully give her the eye drops.
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Do not massage her eyes. You may think that massaging your cat’s eyes will help spread the eye drops across the eyes. However, the drops will disperse quickly on their own. Your cat may enjoy having an eye massage after getting the drops, but it is not necessary from a medical standpoint.

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