How To Choose A Cat

how to choose a cat 1

How To Choose A Cat

10 Tips to Choose the Right Shelter Cat Cats, Responsible pet ownership Have you been thinking about getting a new cat to add to your family? It’s usually pretty easy to find kittens, especially in rural areas like ours. Usually you know someone (or someone who knows someone) whose cat has just had an unexpected litter of kittens and is trying to find homes for them. And this can be a great way to adopt a new cat into your family. But what if you don’t know someone whose cat has just had kittens? Or what if you are thinking about an adult cat instead of a kitten? Then a visit to your local animal shelter might be in your plans! Here are our 10 tips for choosing the shelter cat that is right for you and your family: Photo from Gibson County Animal Services Facebook page. Start with a few ideas of the temperament of the cat you would like. Do you want a lap cat? One who will say hi when you get home but is content to be by himself most of the time? Do a little preparation before you visit the shelter so you know what you are looking for. How much time to you have to dedicate to your new cat? Kittens have a lot of energy, and need a lot of time and attention. They need a lot of interactive playtime, and will need some training (where it is okay to climb and claw, and where it is not; most cats instinctively know how to use the litter box). Adult cats tend to not need quite so much dedicated playtime or training, but will still want some of your love and attention. If you lead a very busy lifestyle, a young kitten may not be the best choice for you right now. Do you have kids? What ages are they? Keep in mind that small children (especially those who have not been around animals before) may not know how to handle a cat, especially a small kitten. Consider waiting until your children are old enough to understand how to touch and pet a cat, or consider getting an older cat who may be more tolerant of children than a kitten might be. When you get to the shelter, take a quick walk through the cat room before stopping to visit with any one cat. See how each cat reacts to you walking by, and pay attention to those who seem to be interested in meeting you. Keep in mind, cats can sleep up to 17 hours a day, so don’t rule out that cute one taking a cat nap in the corner. Go back and have a short visit (through the door) with any cats who you think you are interested in. Watch for them to come up to the door and try to smell you or rub their faces or bodies on the door. Ask the shelter staff to wake up that cute little one so you can meet her, too. If the shelter has the space, spend a few minutes in a quiet place alone with each cat that you are interested in. How this interaction goes will be very different based on each cat’s personality. For some cats, the more you try to get their attention the more they will ignore you. For other cats, the more you ignore them the more they will want your attention! Remember, most of these cats want more love and attention than they get every day, so they should be interested in meeting you. Do give them some time to warm up to you, as many cats are cautious around new people. See how the cat reacts to being petted. If the cat tries to bite or swat at you after being petted just a few times, this may not be the cat for you (especially if you have small children). Try picking up the cat to see how she tolerates that. Some cats enjoy being picked up and held; these will often be good lap cats. Some cats do not like being picked up, and that is okay, depending on how the cat’s other behaviors mesh with what you are looking for. If the cat gets frantic and tries to claw at you to get down, this may not be the right cat for you. f you have kids, bring them along on the shelter visit to see how the cat interacts with them (or bring them back when you have already narrowed your choices down to 1 or 2 cats). You are looking for a cat who seems patient around kids, is interested in being around them, but will move away when they get overwhelmed by the attention (rather than trying to bite or claw to get away). Ask lots of questions, anything you can think of! Ask how long the cat has been in the shelter, if they know why he was surrendered there, if he has a favorite person or other cat there, his medical history, what his normal behaviors are, and if the shelter employees have any concerns about adopting this cat (in general, or with your family in particular). The only silly question is the one you don’t ask, so don’t be shy! You may notice that a lot of these recommendations are similar to our 10 tips for choosing the right shelter dog. But there are a few differences in what you will be looking for in a cat versus a dog. Above all, take your time when you are considering adopting a new furry family member. Many cats (and dogs) can live for 10-15 years, or even longer. Remember, you are making this choice for your family – and for your new pet – for their life! Are you getting ready to adopt a new shelter pet, or have you recently gotten one? Call us (or your regular veterinarian) or come in to ask any questions you might have about your new furry family member! adopt, adoption, animal shelter, cat, pet, shelter, shelter cat. Bookmark.
how to choose a cat 1

READ :  Cat Game Iphone

How To Choose A Cat

Have you been thinking about getting a new cat to add to your family? It’s usually pretty easy to find kittens, especially in rural areas like ours. Usually you know someone (or someone who knows someone) whose cat has just had an unexpected litter of kittens and is trying to find homes for them. And this can be a great way to adopt a new cat into your family. But what if you don’t know someone whose cat has just had kittens? Or what if you are thinking about an adult cat instead of a kitten? Then a visit to your local animal shelter might be in your plans! Here are our 10 tips for choosing the shelter cat that is right for you and your family: Photo from Gibson County Animal Services Facebook page. Start with a few ideas of the temperament of the cat you would like. Do you want a lap cat? One who will say hi when you get home but is content to be by himself most of the time? Do a little preparation before you visit the shelter so you know what you are looking for. How much time to you have to dedicate to your new cat? Kittens have a lot of energy, and need a lot of time and attention. They need a lot of interactive playtime, and will need some training (where it is okay to climb and claw, and where it is not; most cats instinctively know how to use the litter box). Adult cats tend to not need quite so much dedicated playtime or training, but will still want some of your love and attention. If you lead a very busy lifestyle, a young kitten may not be the best choice for you right now. Do you have kids? What ages are they? Keep in mind that small children (especially those who have not been around animals before) may not know how to handle a cat, especially a small kitten. Consider waiting until your children are old enough to understand how to touch and pet a cat, or consider getting an older cat who may be more tolerant of children than a kitten might be. When you get to the shelter, take a quick walk through the cat room before stopping to visit with any one cat. See how each cat reacts to you walking by, and pay attention to those who seem to be interested in meeting you. Keep in mind, cats can sleep up to 17 hours a day, so don’t rule out that cute one taking a cat nap in the corner. Go back and have a short visit (through the door) with any cats who you think you are interested in. Watch for them to come up to the door and try to smell you or rub their faces or bodies on the door. Ask the shelter staff to wake up that cute little one so you can meet her, too. If the shelter has the space, spend a few minutes in a quiet place alone with each cat that you are interested in. How this interaction goes will be very different based on each cat’s personality. For some cats, the more you try to get their attention the more they will ignore you. For other cats, the more you ignore them the more they will want your attention! Remember, most of these cats want more love and attention than they get every day, so they should be interested in meeting you. Do give them some time to warm up to you, as many cats are cautious around new people. See how the cat reacts to being petted. If the cat tries to bite or swat at you after being petted just a few times, this may not be the cat for you (especially if you have small children). Try picking up the cat to see how she tolerates that. Some cats enjoy being picked up and held; these will often be good lap cats. Some cats do not like being picked up, and that is okay, depending on how the cat’s other behaviors mesh with what you are looking for. If the cat gets frantic and tries to claw at you to get down, this may not be the right cat for you. f you have kids, bring them along on the shelter visit to see how the cat interacts with them (or bring them back when you have already narrowed your choices down to 1 or 2 cats). You are looking for a cat who seems patient around kids, is interested in being around them, but will move away when they get overwhelmed by the attention (rather than trying to bite or claw to get away). Ask lots of questions, anything you can think of! Ask how long the cat has been in the shelter, if they know why he was surrendered there, if he has a favorite person or other cat there, his medical history, what his normal behaviors are, and if the shelter employees have any concerns about adopting this cat (in general, or with your family in particular). The only silly question is the one you don’t ask, so don’t be shy! You may notice that a lot of these recommendations are similar to our 10 tips for choosing the right shelter dog. But there are a few differences in what you will be looking for in a cat versus a dog. Above all, take your time when you are considering adopting a new furry family member. Many cats (and dogs) can live for 10-15 years, or even longer. Remember, you are making this choice for your family – and for your new pet – for their life! Are you getting ready to adopt a new shelter pet, or have you recently gotten one? Call us (or your regular veterinarian) or come in to ask any questions you might have about your new furry family member!

READ :  Home Remedies For Cats With Diarrhea

How To Choose A Cat

Similar Posts:

READ :  Names For A Gray Cat

How To Choose A Cat
How To Choose A Cat
How To Choose A Cat
How To Choose A Cat
How To Choose A Cat