Insulin For Cats

Insulin For Cats

Insulin For Cats

Alternatives to Insulin InjectionsIn most cases of feline diabetes, insulin is the treatment of choice. The thought of giving insulin injections daily is a scary prospect for many cat owners. As a result, if your cat is diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, you may be wondering if there is an alternative to treating with insulin. There may be other treatment options that are worth exploring in a situation where your cat’s personality is not conducive to receiving daily or twice daily injections of insulin or where you are physically incapable of giving the insulin injections.

Insulin For Cats

insulin for cats 1

Insulin For Cats

Oral hypoglycemic medications such as glipizide and acarbose are one such option. These medications act to help lower the blood glucose levels. They are given by mouth and are most effective for cats with mild diabetes. They are effective for some, but not all, diabetic cats.Strictly Controlled Diet as Possible AlternativeA strictly controlled diet can be useful in controlling the blood glucose levels of cats with diabetes. Diet by itself may or may not be completely effective, and it is most likely to work for cats that do not have severe diabetes.

Insulin For Cats

The most commonly recommended food for a cat with diabetes is a diet containing high levels of protein and low levels of carbohydrates. Canned cat foods are preferred if commercial diets are used (as opposed to kibble or dry food).A high protein, low carbohydrate diet can be combined with one of the oral hypoglycemic medications to further help regulate your cat’s blood glucose levels. It is possible that this may be more effective than using diet or medication alone.Other Considerations in the Treatment of Diabetic CatsAnother important consideration in treating a cat with diabetes, especially if the disease is caught early, is that remission is possible in many cases, if regulation of blood glucose levels can be controlled effectively.

Insulin For Cats

For that reason, aggressive treatment started early is considered to be the best course.In many cases, insulin injections provide better glycemic control (control of blood sugar levels) than other medications. Insulin injections, particularly combined with a proper diet, are effective in converting many cats to a state of remission. This means that insulin injections may be necessary only for a short period of time and then your cat may not need them anymore.Theoretically, any treatment that is capable of rapidly and effectively regulating the blood glucose levels can lead to remission. However, in practice, many cats respond better to insulin injections than they do to the oral hypoglycemic agents. For this reason, even though alternative treatments may be available if the situation warrants them, insulin is likely to remain the treatment of choice. Read More

Insulin For Cats

Alternatives to Insulin InjectionsIn most cases of feline diabetes, insulin is the treatment of choice. The thought of giving insulin injections daily is a scary prospect for many cat owners. As a result, if your cat is diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, you may be wondering if there is an alternative to treating with insulin. There may be other treatment options that are worth exploring in a situation where your cat’s personality is not conducive to receiving daily or twice daily injections of insulin or where you are physically incapable of giving the insulin injections. Oral hypoglycemic medications such as glipizide and acarbose are one such option.

Insulin For Cats

These medications act to help lower the blood glucose levels. They are given by mouth and are most effective for cats with mild diabetes. They are effective for some, but not all, diabetic cats.Strictly Controlled Diet as Possible AlternativeA strictly controlled diet can be useful in controlling the blood glucose levels of cats with diabetes. Diet by itself may or may not be completely effective, and it is most likely to work for cats that do not have severe diabetes.The most commonly recommended food for a cat with diabetes is a diet containing high levels of protein and low levels of carbohydrates. Canned cat foods are preferred if commercial diets are used (as opposed to kibble or dry food).A high protein, low carbohydrate diet can be combined with one of the oral hypoglycemic medications to further help regulate your cat’s blood glucose levels.

It is possible that this may be more effective than using diet or medication alone.Other Considerations in the Treatment of Diabetic CatsAnother important consideration in treating a cat with diabetes, especially if the disease is caught early, is that remission is possible in many cases, if regulation of blood glucose levels can be controlled effectively. For that reason, aggressive treatment started early is considered to be the best course.In many cases, insulin injections provide better glycemic control (control of blood sugar levels) than other medications. Insulin injections, particularly combined with a proper diet, are effective in converting many cats to a state of remission.

Insulin For Cats
Insulin For Cats

This means that insulin injections may be necessary only for a short period of time and then your cat may not need them anymore.Theoretically, any treatment that is capable of rapidly and effectively regulating the blood glucose levels can lead to remission. However, in practice, many cats respond better to insulin injections than they do to the oral hypoglycemic agents. For this reason, even though alternative treatments may be available if the situation warrants them, insulin is likely to remain the treatment of choice.

Insulin is a hormone naturally produced by the pancreas. Insulin enables the body to use the sugar in food as a source of energy. When the body does not produce enough insulin, or when the insulin produced by the body is not effective enough, this condition is called diabetes mellitus. This condition allows sugar levels in the body to become very high. ProZinc is a protamine zinc insulin, a type of long-acting insulin derived from recombinant human insulin used to reduce hyperglycemia (high blood glucose or sugar) in cats with diabetes mellitus. A licensed veterinarian must prescribe ProZinc insulin for your cat. ProZinc insulin should be given to cats only. Seek medical attention immediately if you accidentally inject yourself with ProZinc insulin. ProZinc is available by prescription as a sterile injectable suspension in 10 ml multidose vials. Each ml of ProZinc product contains 40 International Units (U) of recombinant human insulin and is given to cats by subcutaneous injection.

Production of antibodies against insulin: Insulin and other components added during the manufacture of injectable insulin can be considered ‘foreign’ by the body and cause the body to produce antibodies to destroy them. This is generally quite rare and more likely to occur in cats if pork or human recombinant insulin are used, since when compared to beef insulin, they are less like cat insulin.

Insulin Most diabetic cats require insulin injections administered under their skin twice daily. The injections can be given at home, preferably at the same time each day. Your veterinarian will show you how to give these injections, which are not painful—in fact, most cats are unaware that the injection is being given. Because each is different, the proper type of insulin, dose, and frequency of administration needs to be determined by your veterinarian. Ideally, this is based on an 18- to 24-hour blood glucose profile, obtained through a veterinarian-administered insulin injection and subsequent testing of blood sugar levels at regular intervals throughout the day. Insulin dosage may change with time and may need to be adjusted based on new blood glucose profiles, the results of intermittent blood tests and urine sugar measurements, and the cat’s response to therapy.

Source: Insulin for treatment of cats may be derived from the pancreas of pigs (pork insulin), pancreas of cattle (beef insulin), or combinations of the two; or it can be genetically engineered to be identical to human insulin. The insulin of various mammals differs by only one or several amino acids.

Administration of too much insulin. This can occur if the wrong insulin or wrong type of syringe is used, or a second dose of insulin is given due to miscommunication between family members or to try to make up for a first dose that was improperly given. Some cats can undergo spontaneous remission of their diabetes, i.e., they suddenly produce enough insulin on their own and do not need supplemental insulin. How or why this occurs is not well-understood, and it may be only a temporary phenomenon.

In general, long-acting insulins are most appropriate for cats. Glargine insulin is a human recombinant insulin. It’s formulation results in a constant release of small amounts of insulin. This keeps the blood glucose level far more stable. Glargine is considered to be better than PZI or lente insulins in newly-diagnosed diabetic cats. In some cats, it can even result in remission when used in combination with a low-carbohydrate-high-protein diet. For those cats that have been on long term therapy with other insulins, the results for remission are less likely, though better control is often achieved.

Diabetes mellitus is generally divided into two different types in cats: insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Approximately one-half to three-quarters of diabetic cats have and thus require insulin injections as soon as the disease is diagnosed. The rest have NIDDM; however, most ultimately require insulin injections to control their disease.

 

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