Is My Cat Overweight

is my cat overweight 1

Is My Cat Overweight

Q. When is a cat considered to be fat?   A. Veterinarians often use a 9 point scoring system to evaluate the body condition of pets. A point value of 1 means the cat is extremely thin to the point of emaciation. A score of 9 means the pet is grossly overweight. And like Goldilocks and the three bears, a score of 5 is ‘just right.’ To determine body score, there are several specific areas of the cat we look at. Remember, these are guidelines. NOTE: We have included some illustrations at the end of this article which depict the contours of various body scores. To perform the rating, we first feel the cat’s ribs. We should be able to quite easily feel the ribs. There should be a slight amount of fat over them, but each rib should be distinct. If you can see the ribs, the pet is too thin. If you can not feel them at all, the pet is very overweight. Second, check the area near the base of the tail. There should be a slight fat covering over this area and it should feel smooth. If the bones protrude, the pet is too thin; if you can not feel any bones at all, the pet is very overweight. Third, feel other bony prominences on the pet’s body such as the spine, shoulders, and hips. Again, you should be able to feel a small amount of fat over these areas. If these bones are easily felt or visible, the cat is too thin. If you can not feel the bones beneath the layer of fat, the animal is obviously overweight. Fourth, look at your cat from above. The animal should have a definite waist behind the ribs. If the waist is extreme, or again, bony prominences are visible, the animal is too thin. If there is no waist, or worse yet, the area between the ribs and hips is wider than the hips or ribs, the cat is grossly overweight. Fifth, look at the cat from the side. Cats should have an abdominal tuck, i.e., the area behind the ribs should be smaller in diameter than the chest. An animal who is too thin will have a very severe abdominal tuck. Overweight animals will have no abdominal tuck. If you feel your cat is overweight, consult your veterinarian to determine if there are any other medical problems before starting the animal on a weight reduction program. Your veterinarian can also suggest various diets, how fast your pet should lose weight, etc. (Overweight cats can become severely ill if their diet is too restricted.) Very Thin Body Score = 1 Thin Body Score = 3 Ideal Body Score = 5 Overweight Body Score = 7 Obese Body Score = 9
is my cat overweight 1

Is My Cat Overweight

Obesity in Cats and How to Put a Cat on a Diet Ever wonder what to do about your overweight cat? Overweight and actually obese cats outnumber cats of normal weight and are being seen more and more commonly by veterinarians for various disorders. In fact, obesity in cats can predispose the cat to diabetes, hepatic lipidosis and arthritis. However, putting a cat on a diet or weight loss plan needs to be approached very carefully. Here we will try and assist you with your overweight cats so that your kitty won't have to be encumbered by obesity. A 2011 study by APOP (Association for Pet Obesity Prevention) found that over 50 percent of cats were either obese or overweight. So what is happening that predisposes our domestic felines to a life of sedentary obesity? The answer is multifactorial but to simplify, just remember this: any individual mammal (dog, cat, horse, human, etc.) will gain body weight if it consumes more calories than it burns as fuel for energy. That’s pretty simple, but true. In nature, food acquisition has never been a sure thing for any creature — not for canines, felines or humans. So food acquisition has always been accompanied by physical exertion to capture (or cultivate) and consume the food. It is only in recent times that the unnatural situation of food excess, readily acquired and consumed with little accompanying physical exertion, has become a way of life. We humans have figured how not to have to do all that work of capturing and cultivating to build up stores of food. Through agricultural expertise we have learned how to grow food and raise livestock and to have those food sources readily available and in abundance … just in case we get hungry! We learned how to refrigerate, dry, preserve and store foods in large quantities that assured us we would not have to endure long and unsuccessful hunting forays nor suffer through famines. We have also created the very same food acquisition assurances for our domestic dogs and cats. They, as we, no longer have to hunt to survive. Indeed, we no longer even have to live outdoors. It’s interesting that our pets have mirrored our own tendency to have trouble with weight control. The major difference, though, is that we humans have complete control over what our pets eat and how much they eat. Unless your cat is sneaking into the fridge and making ham and cheese sandwiches late at night when no one is around, the only way they get to eat is when YOU place the food in front of them. Every veterinarian has repeatedly heard a serious-minded cat (or dog) owner state “I know you think she’s overweight, Doctor, but it isn’t from the food! She hardly eats a thing.” Well, is the pet overweight from high calorie air? Maybe it’s the water … or from laying on that couch all the time. That’s it! The couch is making the kitty fat, not the food. Seriously, far too many pet owners truly believe that food intake has nothing at all to do with their pet’s weight and no amount of counseling will convince them otherwise. If that describes your position, read no further because the rest of this article is all about how to feed the proper food and in the correct quantity so that the cat will lose weight safely or maintain an optimum weight. There will be nothing in this article about the effect of high calorie air, water or comfortable furniture on the cat’s weight problem. Any cat that is overweight should have a physical exam performed, exact weight measured and blood and urine tests run. It is vital that normal thyroid hormone levels are present and that the cat has no physical or metabolic dysfunction. If the cat is physically normal — other than the abnormal body weight from fat deposition — then a gradual and careful weight loss program can be instituted. First, let’s look at what the causes of obesity are and what we can do to correct OUR mistakes … 1 2 3 4 Next livestockThe term for domesticated farm animals that are raised for work, wool, milk, and other products and uses. May include pigs, cows, horses, and poultry. metabolismThe group of processes that involve the use of nutrients by the body stimulusAnything that produces an action or reaction insulinA hormone created by the pancreas that helps to regulate the flow of glucose pancreasA gland that aids in both digestive and insulin functions enzymeA substance that causes chemical change to another arthritisA medical condition in which the joints become inflamed and causes a great deal of pain. digestive tractThe whole system involved in digestion from mouth to anus dry matterThe amount of matter in a certain type of feed without the moisture amylaseTerm used to refer to a certain enzyme that the pancreas creates to help in the digestion of certain starches. hepaticReferring to the liver
is my cat overweight 2

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Is My Cat Overweight

Ever wonder what to do about your overweight cat? Overweight and actually obese cats outnumber cats of normal weight and are being seen more and more commonly by veterinarians for various disorders. In fact, obesity in cats can predispose the cat to diabetes, hepatic lipidosis and arthritis. However, putting a cat on a diet or weight loss plan needs to be approached very carefully. Here we will try and assist you with your overweight cats so that your kitty won't have to be encumbered by obesity. A 2011 study by APOP (Association for Pet Obesity Prevention) found that over 50 percent of cats were either obese or overweight. So what is happening that predisposes our domestic felines to a life of sedentary obesity? The answer is multifactorial but to simplify, just remember this: any individual mammal (dog, cat, horse, human, etc.) will gain body weight if it consumes more calories than it burns as fuel for energy. That’s pretty simple, but true. In nature, food acquisition has never been a sure thing for any creature — not for canines, felines or humans. So food acquisition has always been accompanied by physical exertion to capture (or cultivate) and consume the food. It is only in recent times that the unnatural situation of food excess, readily acquired and consumed with little accompanying physical exertion, has become a way of life. We humans have figured how not to have to do all that work of capturing and cultivating to build up stores of food. Through agricultural expertise we have learned how to grow food and raise livestock and to have those food sources readily available and in abundance … just in case we get hungry! We learned how to refrigerate, dry, preserve and store foods in large quantities that assured us we would not have to endure long and unsuccessful hunting forays nor suffer through famines. We have also created the very same food acquisition assurances for our domestic dogs and cats. They, as we, no longer have to hunt to survive. Indeed, we no longer even have to live outdoors. It’s interesting that our pets have mirrored our own tendency to have trouble with weight control. The major difference, though, is that we humans have complete control over what our pets eat and how much they eat. Unless your cat is sneaking into the fridge and making ham and cheese sandwiches late at night when no one is around, the only way they get to eat is when YOU place the food in front of them. Every veterinarian has repeatedly heard a serious-minded cat (or dog) owner state “I know you think she’s overweight, Doctor, but it isn’t from the food! She hardly eats a thing.” Well, is the pet overweight from high calorie air? Maybe it’s the water … or from laying on that couch all the time. That’s it! The couch is making the kitty fat, not the food. Seriously, far too many pet owners truly believe that food intake has nothing at all to do with their pet’s weight and no amount of counseling will convince them otherwise. If that describes your position, read no further because the rest of this article is all about how to feed the proper food and in the correct quantity so that the cat will lose weight safely or maintain an optimum weight. There will be nothing in this article about the effect of high calorie air, water or comfortable furniture on the cat’s weight problem. Any cat that is overweight should have a physical exam performed, exact weight measured and blood and urine tests run. It is vital that normal thyroid hormone levels are present and that the cat has no physical or metabolic dysfunction. If the cat is physically normal — other than the abnormal body weight from fat deposition — then a gradual and careful weight loss program can be instituted. First, let’s look at what the causes of obesity are and what we can do to correct OUR mistakes … 1 2 3 4 Next livestockThe term for domesticated farm animals that are raised for work, wool, milk, and other products and uses. May include pigs, cows, horses, and poultry. metabolismThe group of processes that involve the use of nutrients by the body stimulusAnything that produces an action or reaction insulinA hormone created by the pancreas that helps to regulate the flow of glucose pancreasA gland that aids in both digestive and insulin functions enzymeA substance that causes chemical change to another arthritisA medical condition in which the joints become inflamed and causes a great deal of pain. digestive tractThe whole system involved in digestion from mouth to anus dry matterThe amount of matter in a certain type of feed without the moisture amylaseTerm used to refer to a certain enzyme that the pancreas creates to help in the digestion of certain starches. hepaticReferring to the liver

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Is My Cat Overweight

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Is My Cat Overweight
Is My Cat Overweight
Is My Cat Overweight
Is My Cat Overweight