Lung Cancer In Cats

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Lung Cancer In Cats. What is Lung Cancer?There are two types of lung cancer that affect cats: primary lung tumors and metastatic lung tumors. Primary lung tumors, which originate in the lung, are incredibly rare in cats. The number of cases of primary lung tumors in cats has increased in recent years, though the exact reason for the increase is unknown. Metastatic lung tumors are a secondary type of lung cancer that originally forms in another part of the body and spread to the lungs. Both types of lung cancer primarily affect cats that are over ten years of age.
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There are two types of lung cancer that affect cats: primary lung tumors and metastatic lung tumors. Primary lung tumors, which originate in the lung, are incredibly rare in cats. The number of cases of primary lung tumors in cats has increased in recent years, though the exact reason for the increase is unknown. Metastatic lung tumors are a secondary type of lung cancer that originally forms in another part of the body and spread to the lungs. Both types of lung cancer primarily affect cats that are over ten years of age.
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Treatment of Lung Cancer in CatsBefore recommending a course of treatment, the vet will have to determine the stage of the cancer. However, due to the nature of the cancer, treatment is purely palliative in many cases, or done to ease the cat’s pain as opposed to treating the underlying cause. For primary lung tumors, surgery is generally required to remove the part of the lung where the tumor is located. During this process, the veterinary surgeon will administer a variety of pain management medications to the cat in addition to epidural anesthesia. There will also be a chest tube in place that will eliminate any air or fluid in the lungs. Since anesthesia is dangerous for older animals, and even more so for animals who suffer from pulmonary diseases, the cat may be placed on a ventilator during surgery. The surgery will normally be followed by chemotherapy or radiation treatment to slow the spread of any remaining cancer cells. This course of treatment has the best prognosis.For metastatic lung tumors, the vet will recommend treatment based on where the other tumors are located in the body. Certain types of tumors are difficult to remove surgically and may be treated with chemotherapy or radiation. Unfortunately, by the time the cancer spreads to the lungs, it is usually in its aggressive final stages, resulting in a poor prognosis with a high likelihood of tumor recurrence.In most cases of feline lung cancer, anticancer drugs may be ineffective as pulmonary cancer tends to have a strong resistance to drugs.
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Before recommending a course of treatment, the vet will have to determine the stage of the cancer. However, due to the nature of the cancer, treatment is purely palliative in many cases, or done to ease the cat’s pain as opposed to treating the underlying cause. For primary lung tumors, surgery is generally required to remove the part of the lung where the tumor is located. During this process, the veterinary surgeon will administer a variety of pain management medications to the cat in addition to epidural anesthesia. There will also be a chest tube in place that will eliminate any air or fluid in the lungs. Since anesthesia is dangerous for older animals, and even more so for animals who suffer from pulmonary diseases, the cat may be placed on a ventilator during surgery. The surgery will normally be followed by chemotherapy or radiation treatment to slow the spread of any remaining cancer cells. This course of treatment has the best prognosis.For metastatic lung tumors, the vet will recommend treatment based on where the other tumors are located in the body. Certain types of tumors are difficult to remove surgically and may be treated with chemotherapy or radiation. Unfortunately, by the time the cancer spreads to the lungs, it is usually in its aggressive final stages, resulting in a poor prognosis with a high likelihood of tumor recurrence.In most cases of feline lung cancer, anticancer drugs may be ineffective as pulmonary cancer tends to have a strong resistance to drugs.
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Causes of Lung Cancer in CatsThe causes of lung cancer may vary depending on whether or not the cancer is primary or metastatic. However, the primary cause of lung, and many other types of cancer, is exposure to carcinogenic substances in the environment. Cats that live in households with an active smoker are twice as likely to develop cancer as those that live in smoke-free households.
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The prevention of feline cancer mainly depends on the cat’s diet and lifestyle, as well as an ability to detect early signs and symptoms of cancer prior to advancement to a further stage. If cancer is detected at an earlier stage, it has a higher chance of being treated, therefore lessening the chances of fatality. Taking domesticated cats for regular checkups to the veterinarian can help spot signs and symptoms of cancer early on and help maintain a healthy lifestyle. Further, due to advancements in research, prevention of certain types of feline illnesses remains possible. A widely known preventative of feline leukemia virus is the vaccine which was created in 1969. Subsequently, an immunofloures-cent antibody (IFA) test for the detection of FeLV in the blood of infected cats was formulated. The IFA test was mainly used to experiment the chances of felines being exposed to cancer. The results showed that 33% of cats who were exposed to FeLV related diseases were at a higher risk for acquiring it, while the cats that were left unexposed were left unaffected. FeLV is either spread through contagion or infection and once infected it is possible for cats to stay that way for the rest of their lives.
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Spaying and neutering holds many advantages to cats, including lowering the risk for developing cancer. Neutering male cats makes them less subjected to testicular cancer, FeLV, and FIV. Spaying female cats lowers the risk for mammary cancer, ovarian, or uterine cancer, as it prevents them from going into heat. Female cats should be spayed before their first heat, as each cycle of heat creates a greater risk for mammary cancer. Spaying a female cat requires the removal of the ovaries and uterus, which would eliminate their chances of developing cancer in these areas.
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The symptoms of lung cancer may differ depending on where the cancer originated, how aggressive it is, and whether or not the affected cat has suffered from prior lung disease. Symptoms may manifest in different ways, and some may not appear at all. For example, certain breathing problems and coughing are surprisingly uncommon; less than a third of cats diagnosed with lung cancer have breathing problems.
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Interaction with other cats with strains or diseases related to FeLV can be a great risk factor for cats attaining FeLV themselves. Therefore, a main factor in prevention is keeping the affected cats in quarantine from the unaffected cats. Stray cats, or indoor/outdoor cats have been shown to be at a greater risk for acquiring FeLV, since they have a greater chance of interacting with other cats. Domesticated cats that are kept indoors are the least vulnerable to susceptible diseases.
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The causes of lung cancer may vary depending on whether or not the cancer is primary or metastatic. However, the primary cause of lung, and many other types of cancer, is exposure to carcinogenic substances in the environment. Cats that live in households with an active smoker are twice as likely to develop cancer as those that live in smoke-free households.
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Lung Adenocarcinoma in Cats Adenocarcinoma is a malignant neoplasm, making up about 75 percent of all primary lung tumors in cats. Adenocarcinoma grows rapidly and metastasizes to distant parts of the body and organs, including the brain, eyes, bones, and lymph nodes. Like other malignant tumors, adenocarcinoma of the lungs is usually seen in older animals (more than ten years). This type of carcinoma is relatively rare in cats, with no known breed disposition. Symptoms and Types Most symptoms are related to the respiratory system, but in cases of metastasis the symptoms vary depending upon the location of the metastasis in the body. Following are some of the symptoms seen in patients with lung adenocarcinoma: Pain Dyspnea (difficult breathing) Tachypnea (rapid breathing) Low energy level and lethargy Poor appetite Gradual weight loss Hemoptysis (coughing up blood) Lameness in cases of metastasis to bones Muscle wasting Fever in some patients Ascites (an accumulation of fluid in the peritoneal cavity of the abdomen) Causes Idiopathic – exact cause is still unknown Suspected risk factors include living in an urban environment and passive cigarette smoking, but not proven Diagnosis You will need to give a thorough history of your cat’s health, including a background history of symptoms. After taking a detailed history and performing a thorough physical examination, your veterinarian will order various laboratory tests, including a complete blood profile, a chemical blood profile, a complete blood count, and X-ray studies. Thoracic (chest) radiographs are the most important tool in diagnosing this condition in pets. An ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) scan, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may also be used in some patients to confirm diagnosis. The CT scan and MRI may also help in determining the possibility of metastasis of the tumor into other parts of the body. 1 2 Next metastasisThe growth of pathogens away from the original site of the disease prognosisThe prediction of a disease’s outcome in advance malignantSomething that becomes worse or life threatening as it spreads lethargyThe condition of being drowsy, listless, or weak dispositionAn animal’s attitude or temperament adenocarcinomaThe result of a malignant growth of the tissue of the epithelial gland. lymph nodesSmall structures that filter out the lymph and store lymphocytes.

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