Best Indoor Cats

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Best Indoor Cats

It’s a given fact that cats are carnivorous. While the felines we live with may seem domesticated, the evidence of their teeth, claws and the occasionally mouse corpse on the doorstep — or, in the case of a friend’s cat, her bed — attest to their hunters’ hearts.  So why do we sometimes catch our cats chomping grass in the lawn or attacking potted plants? One theory is that when cats hunted prey, they digested the leafy contents of their dinner’s stomach and that second-hand meal provided necessary nutrients. Another theory is that consuming fiber from grass helps move those pesky hairballs along. It’s also possible that cats like to chew plants because they’re sensory-seekers and it simply feels good on their teeth, like an oral change of scenery. Regardless of the reason, it seems that some cats require leafy greens. Indoor cats, lacking access to the many chompable grasses of the great outdoors, are likely to get their greens where they can. This spells danger for your indoor plants and your cat, as many indoor plants are toxic and even deadly if ingested. So what’s a cat lover to do? In order to provide for this need in the healthiest way possible, pet owners have turned gardener and brought a bit of the outdoors inside by growing patches of grass just for kitty. Here are a few tips and tricks to get you started. Choose your Seeds If your cat likes to lounge while he gnaws, plant rye grass. It’s durable and will bounce back after the cat gets bored and wanders off. For a heavy duty chomper, plant barley grass, which grows fast and high. Wheatgrass is an ideal multitasker — use it in your morning smoothie if you don’t mind sharing with Fluffy. You may have added kale to your diet, and your cat may enjoy some kale sprouts in hers. Tips for growing indoor grass Select a suitable container that you don’t mind kitty nibbling from. Find a spot where the newly planted seeds won’t be disrupted in their tender infancy. You may need to keep them outside for the first few days. If you’re new to growing indoor plants, be sure the grass is somewhere you’ll lay eyes on it every day so that you’ll get in the habit of watering it regularly. Consider adding grass to your kitty’s catio! Next time you head out of town, be sure to remind the cat sitter to water the kitty garden. Share on Facebook Twitter Pinterest Google + LinkedIn Email You may also like National Park Service hosts its first cat hike How to read your cat’s body language Academic adventure cat ruled the school
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Best Indoor Cats

It’s a given fact that cats are carnivorous. While the felines we live with may seem domesticated, the evidence of their teeth, claws and the occasionally mouse corpse on the doorstep — or, in the case of a friend’s cat, her bed — attest to their hunters’ hearts.  So why do we sometimes catch our cats chomping grass in the lawn or attacking potted plants? One theory is that when cats hunted prey, they digested the leafy contents of their dinner’s stomach and that second-hand meal provided necessary nutrients. Another theory is that consuming fiber from grass helps move those pesky hairballs along. It’s also possible that cats like to chew plants because they’re sensory-seekers and it simply feels good on their teeth, like an oral change of scenery. Regardless of the reason, it seems that some cats require leafy greens. Indoor cats, lacking access to the many chompable grasses of the great outdoors, are likely to get their greens where they can. This spells danger for your indoor plants and your cat, as many indoor plants are toxic and even deadly if ingested. So what’s a cat lover to do? In order to provide for this need in the healthiest way possible, pet owners have turned gardener and brought a bit of the outdoors inside by growing patches of grass just for kitty. Here are a few tips and tricks to get you started. Choose your Seeds If your cat likes to lounge while he gnaws, plant rye grass. It’s durable and will bounce back after the cat gets bored and wanders off. For a heavy duty chomper, plant barley grass, which grows fast and high. Wheatgrass is an ideal multitasker — use it in your morning smoothie if you don’t mind sharing with Fluffy. You may have added kale to your diet, and your cat may enjoy some kale sprouts in hers. Tips for growing indoor grass Select a suitable container that you don’t mind kitty nibbling from. Find a spot where the newly planted seeds won’t be disrupted in their tender infancy. You may need to keep them outside for the first few days. If you’re new to growing indoor plants, be sure the grass is somewhere you’ll lay eyes on it every day so that you’ll get in the habit of watering it regularly. Consider adding grass to your kitty’s catio! Next time you head out of town, be sure to remind the cat sitter to water the kitty garden.
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Best Indoor Cats

The American Pet Products Manufacturers Association’s 2009-10 Pet Owners Survey reports that there are approximately 93.6 million cats living in US households, while there are only about 77.5 million dogs. Part of the reason cats have overtaken dogs in the house pet popularity contest is that cats adapt more easily to indoor life and can cope better with their humans’ busy lifestyles. However, some cats still make for better apartment housemates than others.
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Best Indoor Cats

Indoor cats, lacking access to the many chompable grasses of the great outdoors, are likely to get their greens where they can. This spells danger for your indoor plants and your cat, as many indoor plants are toxic and even deadly if ingested.
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Best Indoor Cats

Feline AIDS is a highly contagious, incurable disease for which there is no vaccine. It can only be prevented by keeping cats indoors. It is one of several deadly diseases that cats who roam outdoors can catch. Unattended cats also face dangers posed by dogs, wildlife, and the scariest predator of all, humans.
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Best Indoor Cats

Cats love to scratch. Doing so enables them to remove broken claws, stretch muscles, and mark “territory.” The best way to save your furniture is to provide lots of “approved” places to scratch. Cat “trees” and posts, cardboard scratching boxes, and those ingenious “cat tracks” (a ball in a circular, partially open plastic tunnel surrounding a cardboard scratching pad) are big hits. Sprinkle catnip on them weekly to keep cats interested, and be sure to replace cardboard inserts when they get worn out.
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Best Indoor Cats

4. Maine Coon One of the most beloved of American breed cats, the Maine Coon is also one of our oldest companion cats. Working side-by-side on the family farms of early settlers, the Coon has had a lot of time to get to know us and adapt to our needs. Patient with active children, the Coon will help to temper a child’s mercurial nature with its calm nature, while making sure that the child gets some exercise time with some catch and fetch games. The Coon is also an excellent friend on long, quiet winter nights.
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Best Indoor Cats

It’s a given fact that cats are carnivorous. While the felines we live with may seem domesticated, the evidence of their teeth, claws and the occasionally mouse corpse on the doorstep — or, in the case of a friend’s cat, her bed — attest to their hunters’ hearts.  So why do we sometimes catch our cats chomping grass in the lawn or attacking potted plants?
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One theory is that when cats hunted prey, they digested the leafy contents of their dinner’s stomach and that second-hand meal provided necessary nutrients. Another theory is that consuming fiber from grass helps move those pesky hairballs along. It’s also possible that cats like to chew plants because they’re sensory-seekers and it simply feels good on their teeth, like an oral change of scenery.
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There are lots of mellow, easygoing cats waiting at animal shelters for permanent homes. If you choose to adopt from a rescue organization, look for an adult cat. Once a cat is three years old or so, its personality is fully formed, and the shelter staff can help you find a feline friend that fits your lifestyle. If you can cope with the fact that your cat may not be with you for many years, senior cats tend to be especially calm and would welcome a warm and loving home for their golden years.
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Consider adopting two cats, either littermates or adult cats with compatible personalities. They can keep each other company and entertain one another while you’re away, and you’ll get twice as much love and affection when you return home after a long day.
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Thieves, or “bunchers,” cruise neighborhoods for friendly dogs and cats who can easily be picked up and sold to dealers, who in turn sell them to laboratories. Cats are often poisoned, shot, set on fire, or trapped and drowned by intolerant neighbors or bored juveniles. They are hit by cars, accidentally poisoned by spilled antifreeze, or maimed by fan blades when they crawl into warm engines on winter days.

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