Homemade Cat Scratcher

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Homemade Cat Scratcher

We love our furry little felines almost as much as our own family, but no one wants their couch and carpets clawed to shreds. Luckily, a few design-minded cat ladies (and gents) have reconceived the lowly cat scratcher into beautifully conceived home items that could almost double as sculptural art for your home. Here, a roundup of our favorites that’ll have your cat living large. Follow us on Facebook , Instagram , and Pinterest for nonstop inspiration delivered fresh to your feed, every…
homemade cat scratcher 1

Homemade Cat Scratcher

Cats OutsideCat Scratching PostBeautiful CatsCool CatsCat TreesCat StuffCat ScratcherGood IdeasWoodsForwardWe love our furry little felines almost as much as our own family, but no one wants their couch and carpets clawed to shreds. Luckily, a few design-minded cat ladies (and gents) have reconceived the lowly cat scratcher into beautifully conceived home items that could almost double as sculptural art for your home. Here, a roundup of our favorites that’ll have your cat living large. Follow us on Facebook , Instagram , and Pinterest for nonstop inspiration delivered fresh to your feed, every…See More
homemade cat scratcher 2

Homemade Cat Scratcher

Nice!

Homemade Cat Scratcher

I make a similar scratcher for my cat, but without glue. I'm just about to do an Instructable for it, figured I'd search first and see what else was out there. Free cardboard is so, so handy! I've actually wondered if the companies making the $10 scratchers are *also* getting it free. I bet they are!

Homemade Cat Scratcher

I like your step about how a cat is required. 🙂

Homemade Cat Scratcher

homemade cat scratcher 3

Homemade Cat Scratcher

no glue. I got the cardboard precut from some envelope boxes. There was a center divider down the center of the flats of envlopes. The cardboard, looked at edgwise, is in a V shape.. I just crammed as many as possible in the frame. You can see about two inches from the end where there's a notch. Originally I made a frameless scratcher by just strapping the cardboard in that notch, However using just the frame works better
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Homemade Cat Scratcher

I am in the process of making this and another, horizontal cardboard scratcher. If you have a teenager you want to keep busy for a day or so, I highly recommend this project! Haha! I can’t wait to see the finished project. Had to take a break from cutting, ran out of daylight and the light in my garage isn’t so great.
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Part 2 Making the Post 1 Choose the post. Purchase a 4 in by 4 in (10 cm by 10 cm) piece of wood from the hardware store. Alternatively, nail two 2 in by 4 in (5 cm by 10 cm) pieces of wood together, making sure they line up evenly. 2 Attach the post to the base. Put the base upside down (carpeted side facing the post) on top of the post. Ensure it is centered and screw the post into the base using 2 in (5 cm) wood screws. Then, flip the base around so it is on the ground, with the post on top. The length of the post is up to you, just make sure it is long enough for your cat to stretch on. If you’re not sure how long to make it, measure your cat from nose to end of tail, then add a few in/cm. 3 Cover the top of the post. Get a 4 in by 4 in (10 cm by 10 cm) beveled wood square from the hardware store for a neat post topper. Use wood glue to attach the topper to the post. Alternatively, you can cover the top in carpet and staple it down. Put two staples on each side of the post, rather than on the top. 4 Cut the post carpet to size. It needs to be at least 20 in (51 cm) wide in order to wrap around the post, and the exact height of the post. Use an X-acto knife and a ruler to ensure you have a neat, straight line. 5 Wrap carpet around the post. Start at a corner and staple the carpet in place every 1 in (2.5 cm) vertically. Wrap the carpet completely around the post and staple it in place every 1 in (2.5 cm) along the vertical seam. Cut off any excess, and ensure you have a smooth seam so your cat’s claws don’t snag on the fabric. 6 Use rope as an alternative to carpet. Alternatively, you can wrap the post in sisal rope rather than carpet. Cover your post in non-toxic glue to ensure the rope won’t unravel. Wind the rope around the bottom of the post and staple it in place. Continue winding the rope all the way to the top of the post, making sure your rows are neat, straight, and very close together. Add staples if the glue doesn’t seem to be holding the rope well enough. 7 Flatten the hardware. Use a hammer to flatten the staples down. A staple gun does not always create a flush staple, and you want to ensure your cat’s claws don’t get hung up or ripped out due to a staple sticking out of the post.
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1 Choose the post. Purchase a 4 in by 4 in (10 cm by 10 cm) piece of wood from the hardware store. Alternatively, nail two 2 in by 4 in (5 cm by 10 cm) pieces of wood together, making sure they line up evenly. 2 Attach the post to the base. Put the base upside down (carpeted side facing the post) on top of the post. Ensure it is centered and screw the post into the base using 2 in (5 cm) wood screws. Then, flip the base around so it is on the ground, with the post on top. The length of the post is up to you, just make sure it is long enough for your cat to stretch on. If you’re not sure how long to make it, measure your cat from nose to end of tail, then add a few in/cm. 3 Cover the top of the post. Get a 4 in by 4 in (10 cm by 10 cm) beveled wood square from the hardware store for a neat post topper. Use wood glue to attach the topper to the post. Alternatively, you can cover the top in carpet and staple it down. Put two staples on each side of the post, rather than on the top. 4 Cut the post carpet to size. It needs to be at least 20 in (51 cm) wide in order to wrap around the post, and the exact height of the post. Use an X-acto knife and a ruler to ensure you have a neat, straight line. 5 Wrap carpet around the post. Start at a corner and staple the carpet in place every 1 in (2.5 cm) vertically. Wrap the carpet completely around the post and staple it in place every 1 in (2.5 cm) along the vertical seam. Cut off any excess, and ensure you have a smooth seam so your cat’s claws don’t snag on the fabric. 6 Use rope as an alternative to carpet. Alternatively, you can wrap the post in sisal rope rather than carpet. Cover your post in non-toxic glue to ensure the rope won’t unravel. Wind the rope around the bottom of the post and staple it in place. Continue winding the rope all the way to the top of the post, making sure your rows are neat, straight, and very close together. Add staples if the glue doesn’t seem to be holding the rope well enough. 7 Flatten the hardware. Use a hammer to flatten the staples down. A staple gun does not always create a flush staple, and you want to ensure your cat’s claws don’t get hung up or ripped out due to a staple sticking out of the post.
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Most pet parents learn the hard way their cat needs to scratch this genetic itch. And if given the opportunity, she’ll turn your curtains, carpet, or even your couch into shreds to do so. Here are five ideas for how to make a homemade cat scratching post using simple, inexpensive items.
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Attach the post to the base. Put the base upside down (carpeted side facing the post) on top of the post. Ensure it is centered and screw the post into the base using 2 in (5 cm) wood screws. Then, flip the base around so it is on the ground, with the post on top. The length of the post is up to you, just make sure it is long enough for your cat to stretch on. If you’re not sure how long to make it, measure your cat from nose to end of tail, then add a few in/cm.
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There are no length or depth requirements for the board, so you can choose a size that fits your cat’s needs (the board in the picture is a particle board bookshelf). This board will lay flat on the floor or hang from a wall, so it doesn’t require a base. When choosing a rug, keep in mind cats prefer rough fabric, again with very few loops or loose threads their claws can snag on. Luckily, finding a sturdy but inexpensive area rug for this board is all too easy, and yields a cat accessory you won’t have to hide when company comes over.

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