Mri Cat Scan

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Mri Cat Scan. The following article was written by Christopher P. Hess, M.D., Ph.D, and Derk Purcell, M.D, Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at UCSF. The complexity of the organ that determines how a person thinks, moves, feels, and remembers is overshadowed only by its unique vulnerability. The brain is hidden from direct view by the skull, which not only shields it from injury but also hinders the study of its function in both health and disease. The cells in the arteries that supply the brain are so tightly bound that even most normal cells in the bloodstream are prevented from crossing the so-called “blood-brain barrier,” thereby rendering the normal chemistry of the brain invisible to the routine laboratory blood tests that are often used to evaluate the heart, liver or kidneys. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have revolutionized the study of the brain by allowing doctors and researchers to look at the brain noninvasively. These diagnostic imaging techniques have allowed for the first time the noninvasive evaluation of brain structure, allowing doctors to infer causes of abnormal function due to different diseases.

Mri Cat Scan

Mri Cat Scan

The answer to which imaging modality is better for imaging the brain is dependent on the purpose of the examination. CT and MRI are complementary techniques, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. The choice of which examination is appropriate depends upon how quickly it is necessary to obtain the scan, what part of the head is being examined, and the age of the patient, among other considerations. All imaging studies that are not performed for research should be obtained in close consultation with a physician. Both techniques are designed to examine specific problems. The utility of “screening” CT or MRI, in which a scan is obtained in a healthy patient without any symptoms to look for a brain tumor or any other condition, has not been established. The advantages of each modality listed below serve as general guidelines that doctors use to decide between head CT and MRI: Advantages of head CT CT is much faster than MRI, making it the study of choice in cases of trauma and other acute neurological emergencies CT can be obtained at considerably less cost than MRI, and is sufficient to exclude many neurological disorders CT is less sensitive to patient motion during the examination. because the imaging can be performed much more rapidly CT may be easier to perform in claustrophobic or very heavy patients CT provides detailed evaluation of cortical bone CT allows accurate detection of calcification and metal foreign bodies CT can be performed at no risk to the patient with implantable medical devices, such as cardiac pacemakers, ferromagnetic vascular clips, and nerve stimulators Advantages of head MRI MRI does not use ionizing radiation, and is thus preferred over CT in children and patients requiring multiple imaging examinations MRI has a much greater range of available soft tissue contrast, depicts anatomy in greater detail, and is more sensitive and specific for abnormalities within the brain itself MRI scanning can be performed in any imaging plane without having to physically move the patient MRI contrast agents have a considerably smaller risk of causing potentially lethal allergic reaction MRI allows the evaluation of structures that may be obscured by artifacts from bone in CT images
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Mri Cat Scan

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) combines a powerful magnetic field with an advanced computer system and radio waves to produce accurate, detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and other internal body structures. Differences between normal and abnormal tissue is often clearer on an MRI than CT. There is no radiation exposure with MRI machines. An MRI scan can typically last from 30 minutes to an hour since images are taken as cross sections or “slices” of the body part being scanned, as well as other factors such as the type of technology used (high-field versus open or open upright MRI), what the MRI is looking for and if the patient moves. Patients with claustrophobia typically get anxious in a traditional bore scanner due to having to stay still on a hard table for a long period of time. The machine also makes loud knocking sounds. A comprehensive patient screening procedure is followed as due to the magnetic field, special precautions are made or exams may be canceled for patients with cardiac pacemakers, tattoos and metal implants. A person who is very large may not fit into the opening of a traditional tube MRI scanner or may be over the weight limit for the moving table. Read about the MRI experience and hear what an MRI sounds like MRI is good for: Imaging organs, soft tissue an internal structures (see spine scan image to the right) Showing tissue difference between normal and abnormal Imaging without radiation
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An MRI scan can typically last from 30 minutes to an hour since images are taken as cross sections or “slices” of the body part being scanned, as well as other factors such as the type of technology used (high-field versus open or open upright MRI), what the MRI is looking for and if the patient moves. Patients with claustrophobia typically get anxious in a traditional bore scanner due to having to stay still on a hard table for a long period of time. The machine also makes loud knocking sounds. A comprehensive patient screening procedure is followed as due to the magnetic field, special precautions are made or exams may be canceled for patients with cardiac pacemakers, tattoos and metal implants. A person who is very large may not fit into the opening of a traditional tube MRI scanner or may be over the weight limit for the moving table. Read about the MRI experience and hear what an MRI sounds like
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A CT Scan (or CAT Scan) is best suited for viewing bone injuries, diagnosing lung and chest problems, and detecting cancers. An MRI is suited for examining soft tissue in ligament and tendon injuries, spinal cord injuries, brain tumors, etc. CT scans are widely used in emergency rooms because the scan takes fewer than 5 minutes. An MRI, on the other hand, can take up to 30 minutes.
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Unlike CT scans, which use X-rays, MRI scans use powerful magnetic fields and radio frequency pulses to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and other internal body structures. Differences between normal and abnormal tissue is often clearer on an MRI image than a CT. And while there is no radiation involved in an MRI scan, it can be a noisy exam and takes longer than a CT. A specially trained radiologist can interpret either scan, helping to achieve a quick and accurate diagnosis.
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MRI machines are available in 1.5 T and 3 T (T stands for Tesla) models. 3T models are more expensive but offer higher image quality and shorter scanning times. 1.5 T MRI scanners start at around $1 million and 3T models are 50% more expensive. Manufacturers may include accessories, such as a workstation to view images and contrast injectors, in their quotes for MRI scanners. (For a guide on MRI scanners, see here.)
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MRI scans do not work this way. Instead of using ionizing radiation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses radio waves and powerful magnets to produce diagnostic images. An MRI scanner can apply a magnetic field that lines up all of your body’s protons. Radio waves are applied to these protons in short bursts, which in turn relate a signal that is picked up by the MRI scanner. A computer processes this signal and generates a 3D image of the segment of the body being examined.
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A CAT scan, or a computed tomography scan, uses radiation to evaluate spinal abnormalities. For instance, a CT scan can be used to evaluate spinal fractures, disc herniation, and spinal stenosis, or narrowing of the spinal canal. CT scanning is more rapid than an MRI, and provides better detail of the bones of your spine.
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The answer to which imaging modality is better for imaging the brain is dependent on the purpose of the examination. CT and MRI are complementary techniques, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. The choice of which examination is appropriate depends upon how quickly it is necessary to obtain the scan, what part of the head is being examined, and the age of the patient, among other considerations. All imaging studies that are not performed for research should be obtained in close consultation with a physician. Both techniques are designed to examine specific problems. The utility of “screening” CT or MRI, in which a scan is obtained in a healthy patient without any symptoms to look for a brain tumor or any other condition, has not been established.
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In the 1980s another imaging technique was added to the tools of medicine. Nuclear magnetic resonance is a technology that, using a gigantic magnet, can line up the protons — or nuclei of hydrogen atoms — in an object (or organism) to align with the north-south polarity of the magnet. A computer “reads” this to create an image in a process known as MRI, magnetic resonance imaging. MRI is excellent for observing soft tissues because they have a higher water (and therefore hydrogen) content than bone. MRI can give an image of any plane through the body, while the patient’s experience consists of lying still in a body-sized tube, and hearing the clicks of the machinery.

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